Dating Funding Awarded to the Bradford Kaims

We are pleased to announce that the Bradford Kaims site has been awarded two small funding grants to undertake radiocarbon dating of some of our features across Trench 6, and to tie our coring activities in with the rest of the excavations. The funding was sought immediately after the end of the 2016 season to clarify the dates of certain areas of the excavation uncovered this year.

Primarily, we have been awarded £1500 from the Northumberland County Council Community Chest scheme to date a series of preserved hazelnut shells through our large wooden platform feature in Trench 6, following on from the £1,000 grant we received from this fund in 2015 to enable community volunteer involvement. We selected hazelnut shells as the datable component as they are a very short-lived ecofact, only absorbing base carbon from the atmosphere for a short period (<1 year), rather than over longer periods such as other carbon-storing ecofacts can do. Dating oak (Quercus) for example, can provide discrepancies of up to 500 years, as it can be such a long-lived tree. As the first grant from this fund allowed dozens of community volunteers to come on to site and work with us, especially on the platform area, we thought it appropriate to use the second grant awarded from the Community Chest to date that area of the site, to finalise the good work that our volunteers have done. Many thanks to the Community Chest fund and all of our volunteers for their support and help!

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Community volunteers digging the platform

Our second grant is slightly smaller, a total of £756 awarded to us through the Heritage at Risk and Northumberland County Council Conservation Grant for two more radiocarbon dates on our platform area, which will finalise its dating and allow us to tie this feature into our other chronologies across the site. Hopefully these two dating grants can be used as pump-primer funds on dates to help us get further funding from across the site and landscape. Hopefully we will have more good news for you all soon!

Tom Gardner

 

Bradford Kaims 2015 Interim Report Released

Since the end of the 2016 season we have been working hard to process and assess the material which we extracted from the Bradford Kaims, as well as dispersing to work on our other projects. However, we had a wee bit of catching up to do on the 2015 season, in the form of finalising our interim report. We usually try to get the interim reports done prior to the beginning of the next season, as we managed with our 2013 and 2014 season reports, but time ran away with us this year. However, we can now safely say that the 2015 interim report from the Bradford Kaims is available, open access and on our website!

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Trench 6 under investigation in 2015

I shows the highlights and the less glamorous sides of our 2015 scheme of investigation, and covers all the excavation which took place during out two month season, so please give it a look and let us know what you think!

Evidently it is a slightly slimmed down version of our activities, the full details of which will be presented in our end-of evaluation site monograph. However, it should provide details of our exciting finds, such as the Neolithic timber platform in Trench 6, the timber laid working area in Trench 11, and the stake-built building in Trench 9!

Now, a bit of time off to work on other projects, such as the exciting Blythe Beach work, and then the beginning of the 2016 interim report!

Tom Gardner

Trench 6 Update – Bradford Kaims

 

Trench 6 remains our largest and longest running trench to date at the Bradford Kaims. Each new context we uncover adds to the complexity and variety of information about prehistoric human activity in the area. Here, we highlight just two of the exciting features currently under excavation.

 

THE TROUGH

Over the past couple of weeks, we have uncovered our wooden trough in the northwest corner of the trench. After two years of sitting under tarp, the trough has now been fully excavated and cleaned, with its contents removed down to a beautiful clay base. The trough is made of a hollowed out oak tree and fills with crystal clear water, so may have been used as a well; however, within its fill, fire cracked stones have been found which means that this water was probably being heated.

 

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The trough being fully excavated after half-sectioning.

 

BUILDING A

Earlier in the season we uncovered a suspiciously rectangular-shaped dark fill in the northern side of Trench 6. Upon beginning excavation last week we found a series of four large postholes down one side as well as postholes in each corner. We believe that the colossal postholes suggest that this structure was a building. Lying within the structure is an oblong patch of burnt material, which could possibly be a fire pit. From this pit, we have removed a large pointed post, which could have been one of the posts supporting the structure.

Experimental Prehistoric Pottery

This week’s experimental blog is courtesy of Rachel Brewer, Bradford Kaims Assistant Supervisor.

 

Following on the heels of the beer brewing experiment, our Week 5 experimental archaeology project was an effort to make a variety of pottery vessels using only raw clay sourced from our prehistoric site here at the Bradford Kaims. We knew from previous seasons that the trenches and test pits often turn up natural clay deposits of varying colours and quality. We’ve also had a few examples of possible Neolithic and Bronze Age potsherds surface during excavation; so this summer’s experimental archaeology program seemed like a perfect opportunity to test out our prehistoric potting skills! Altogether, processing the clay, forming the pots, and the subsequent firing turned out to be a messy, fun and educational experiment for all involved.

 

Step 1: Gathering the clay

While digging a series of shovel test pits earlier in the season, we hit upon a substantial deposit of clay about 50cm below topsoil. Seeing a source of raw material for our pottery experiment, I dug out a bucket’s worth to begin processing. Though the clay was mostly light orangey-brown, there was a thin layer of grey overlaying that; it also gathered a good amount of silt and peat on its way out of our 20cmX20cm shovel test pit. Through processing, these colours and textures blended together as shown in the later photos.

 

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The raw clay.

 

Step 2: Processing the clay

This was the longest part of the process, due in part to my own inexperience and also to the wet conditions on site. I knew from research that the best way to process raw clay is often to dry it out completely, grind to a powder, sieve, and slowly reintroduce water until the clay reaches a workable consistency. I also knew how unlikely it would be that we could completely dry out that amount of clay in a timely manner, particularly when it was raining almost daily. So I opted instead for wet processing, which involved the help of several pairs of hands pulling all of the clay into small lumps and mixing/mashing it up with added water in a large plastic box. This part worked better than expected, and after a couple of days of minimal stirring, nearly all of the clay was liquefied.

 

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Slaking the clay on site.

 

At this point we poured the slip (liquid clay) through a sieve to remove the largest inclusions, mostly small stones and twigs. We could have used smaller screens and sieved multiple times for greater purity, but I chose not to since examples of prehistoric pottery found at this and other sites indicate that prehistoric people were not processing their clay to a high degree.

 

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Sieving the slip.

 

For about a week I attempted to do a daily pouring-off of the water that would accumulate on the surface, hoping that between evaporation and pouring off that the clay would thicken a bit every day. The couple of days I was able to let the boxes sit out in the sun did help, but it wasn’t working quickly.

 

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The slowly thickening slip.

 

On one sunny day I cut open a bin liner and laid it out on the grass like a small tarp, then I poured the thickened slip out on the plastic. This increased the surface area the sun could reach and it was noticeably thicker by the end of the work day, but it still wasn’t drying out fast enough. We had to rearrange the experimental schedule and move pottery back a week – I had only a week to get some workable clay and I was running out of ideas!

 

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Spreading out the clay to increase the surface area for evaporation.

 

My final effort involved pouring the clay into an old pillowcase, tying it closed with string and hanging it from a tree to allow the water to drain out with gravity and air. The better part of the week passed before I noticed much of a change, but much to my relief, the night before we were scheduled to make the pots we had somewhat sticky but relatively workable clay!

 

 

Step 3: Forming the pots

Before beginning our pot making, the students used rocks to crush up a few soft pieces of sandstone sourced from Trench 6; we used this sand as temper.

 

 

Since wheels were not used by prehistoric potters, the students learned to use the two most common methods of building pottery without a wheel: the pinch method (formed by pinching a solid ball of clay into the desired shape) and the coiling method (rolling out rings of clay, stacking the rings, and smoothing them together). A small amount of temper was added by each individual to their own allotment of clay. Of course we had some creative minds in the mix who ventured beyond the utilitarian forms like bowls and jars, and by the end of the day we had quite a collection of unique creations! We set everything we made on two log disks that would be easily moveable and would absorb moisture. After that we just had to let everything dry out completely to prepare them for firing.

 

 

Step 4: Firing

When it was time for firing, we began by building a small fire in our fire pit on site. Pottery has to be heated very slowly, so we began by placing the dried pots around the edge of the pit and then slowly moving them in close to the fire. Once the pieces were against the central fire, we began placing larger branches over and around the pots, completely covering them and creating a kiln effect. We kept a large fire burning for about an hour and a half, then allowed it to die down to coals. Since our time on site was limited to 5 hours and the pots needed to be cooling before we left site, we weren’t able to keep the pots firing for the ideal amount of time, which for our purposes would have been around 4 hours.

 

The final step of firing is allowing the pots to completely cool before removing them from the pit. Before we left site for the day, we dug the pots (none of which had broken!) out of the coals, stacking them against one wall of the fire pit and shoveling the coals to the opposite wall. We then covered the pots with a layer of grasses and sedge, placed a couple of metal sheets over the pit to protect the pots from rain, then left for the night.

 

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The fired ceramics hot from the fire.

 

Upon examining the cooled pottery the next day, I was pleased to see that none of the vessels had cracked or exploded during firing. Additionally, the pieces had fired, if not completely through, then most of the way through despite the shortened firing time. The fired pots are noticeably brittle and not completely water tight, but with a little more practice we could probably produce vessels that would be more serviceable. Since we accomplished our goal of using only raw materials from site and a fire to create prehistory-inspired pottery – and we had fun doing it – I’m calling this experiment a success!

 

Bradford Kaims – Trench 14 Update

Trench 14 is actually a combination of two earlier trenches: 8 & 11. 

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Trench 14 and the stone feature within it.

Trench 8

Trench 8 was opened in 2013 and contained an artificial mound comprised of larger stones (30-45 cm in diameter) underneath a layer of smaller stones (4-10 cm in diameter). 

A quarter section was dug out to determine the depth of the mound, and we discovered a thin layer of peat under which lay a brushwood platform. As the season ended, we backfilled the quarter section and left it to future investigations.

Trench 11

Trench 11 was opened in 2015 in an attempt to further understand the stone mound feature by examining the surrounding area, as well as determining if any relationship existed between Trench 8 and the western end of Trench 9 – where a large post was discovered in situ at the end of season 2015. 

A paleochannel with layers of sand and brushwood was discovered at the southern end, which was less than a metre from the north end of Trench 8. One side of the channel edge looked like it may have been cut intentionally though further investigations are required to determine if that was the case. 

Also within the trench, we discovered over 10 pieces of wood around 6 cm wide & ranging from a half metre to one metre in length lying within the peat layer. Two had potential cuts in them, giving us an indication that at least a couple of them were used by early humans. 

So far this season…

We have expanded Trench 14 to include both Trenches 8 and 11, and are in the process of expanding the quarter section to give us a fresh understanding of the stratigraphy of the artificial stone mound and the brushwood platform lying under the peat layer. We also plan to expand the trench into the western edge of Trench 11 to understand if a relationship between 8, 9, 11 and 14 exists. Our plans are to extend into the palaeochannel to determine if it was cut intentionally and to excavate at least partially into the edge of the peat layer to discover if more worked wood exists. 

Season Intro and Week 1 Diary – The Bradford Kaims

A slightly belated blog which is intended to be read in conjunction with yesterday’s post regarding the promontory area.

Written by Tom Gardner, Tom Lally, and Becky Brummet.

 

And so we are back to work at the Bradford Kaims, and thought it would be a good idea to outline our plans for this seasons excavation. We are nearing the end of our evaluation phase on site, and have some areas which we need to finish and wrap up. Our investigations are divided into three areas, the north of the site in Trench 6, the south of the site in Trench 9, and the promontory area with small excavations in Trench 12, Trench 13, and Trench 42.

 

Trench 6

Trench 6 finished last year with a focus upon our wooden platform and a complex pit sequence below the burnt mound deposits. We kicked off this season with a trench clean and photograph, before re-opening an area from 2014 over a series of Neolithic wooden troughs associated with our earlier burnt mound deposits. These troughs pose an interesting sequence of site use, abandonment, and re-use, and are impressive pieces of architecture in themselves. The latest in the sequence is a large and intact oak trunk, which has been hollowed out vertically all the way through, and set in the ground as a trough or well. This is cut into an earlier plank lined trough, and the whole sequences is surrounded by a series of post-holes and pits, with capping burnt mound deposits slumping over the lot.

 

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Trench 6 oak trough.

 

Beyond finishing this sequence, the plans for Trench 6 involve expanding to the north to excavate a later burnt mound identified last year in the section, removing the earlier mounds onto the subsoil, and working out the interface between our burnt mound sequences and the wooden platform from 2015. With this, and the other areas of work, we have a busy summer ahead!

 

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Trench 6 at the end of the 2015 season.

 

Trench 9

Trench 9 finished with a flurry at the end of the 2015 season, and we aim to pick up right where we left off. The trench edges have been redefined, the backfill emptied out, and the flurry of features found last season are visible once again. It’s time to get things started for 2016.

With 2016 likely being the final season that we have Trench 9 open, we have a lot of work to do. Last season ended with the discovery of a possible sweat lodge, Mesolithic hearth and a possible man-made water channel, all of which will need to be investigated this season. As a result of time constraints and having more precise areas to excavate, the dimensions of Trench 9 have been slightly altered to accommodate for this. We will now focus heavily on the middle of the trench where the main features lie, as well as extending the trench out into the fen, in order to determine the purposes of the wooden features and timbers that were cutting into the section in 2015.

 

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Trench 9 at the end of the 2015 season.

 

The specific aims this season are to investigate the heavily wooded area in the North-West corner, excavate our Neolithic post-hole and post further to determine its function, determine the age and function of the wooden ‘plank’ which has been visible since T9 was first opened in 2014, and then focus most of our efforts into the central areas where the hearth, channel and sweat lodge are located. We need to determine the functions of these features individually and then whether they are contemporary with one another. Despite a burnt mound being the reason why this trench was opened to begin with, there is every chance that these features could be the whole reason why prehistoric people were drawn to this location in the landscape in the first place.

 

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Trench 9 at the start of the 2016 season.

 

 

An Excerpt from the Promontory – Bradford Kaims

Trench 12, 13 & 42 were opened (reopened, in T42’s case) this season for sampling & investigations into the burnt mounds located on the promontory.

T12 is a 2m x 3m trench located on the southern end of the promontory. Shortly after opening the trench, we began to find some really interesting artefacts. In the peat layer, we found a piece of burnt quartz & when we continued down through the peat onto the burnt mound layer, we found more: two pieces of worked flint & two pieces of burnt bone! Quite exciting finds for a trench originally opened up for sampling.

 

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A piece of worked flint from trench 12.

 

Trench 13 is 1m x 2m trench located just off the edge of the promontory, near the waters edge. Like T12, it was opened for sampling & has also produced some really interesting finds! Just below our peat layer, we discovered a layer which consists of shells & sand moulded & formed together. In that layer, we uncovered two pieces of charcoal, nine small (4-10cm sized) pieces of worked wood & one log roughly 1m long. We think the smaller wooden pieces may have been stakes & considering their proximity to the waters edge & the fact that a couple were orientated at a 45° angle, it could indicate fencing.

 

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A piece of worked wood from trench 13.

 

A 2m x 4m portion of trench 42 was reopened for sampling, with the focus being on the burnt mound, the trough & the limestone piece. A 1m x 2m spit was dug out of the north end. We expected the burnt mound material to continue at least a half meter, but we quickly uncovered an interesting mottled orange clay layer only 4-5cm into the burnt mound layer.

 

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The re-opening of trench 42.

 

Since the weather has turned more amiable for excavations to continue in our other trenches, we have taken a break from our work on the promontory, but plan on returning to it to as soon as feasible.

Another week in the Finds Department

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The Windmill during a brief respite from the rain.

Good morning from the post-excavation department! We have had a busy few weeks processing some intriguing finds including a possible iron stylus, a worked stone bead, several bits of unidentified burnt clay discs, and a potential lead pendant, to name a few.

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Finds Illustration

Environmental supervisor Thomas Fox has kept our students engaged at the flot tank processing environmental samples from last year while Post-ex supervisor Jeff Aldrich has been taking advantage of the poor weather to give students the a chance to illustrate and process our finds.

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Students Katie and Kelly sorting environmental flotation samples.

The students have also had the opportunity to learn a bit of post-excavation from Bradford Kaims processing finds, including a plethora of worked wooden stakes and the resultant paperwork led by trench supervisor Becky Brummet. Because of its distance from civilisation, it is a separate process at each site: the Castle and the Kaims.

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Students Joe and Rachel filling out timber recording sheets.

With the sun shining and the winds calmer, the students and staff will have ample time in the trenches to find us some new artefacts, hopefully further fleshing out the story of Bamburgh Castle.

Introducing the Staff of the Bradford Kaims, 2016

Site Director
Paul Gething

Paul

I began excavating in 1987 in Coventry. Since then I have worked in the Middle East, North Africa, France, Spain and the length and breadth of the UK. I have excavated and surveyed on sites ranging from palaeolithic to modern industrial, and pretty much everything in between. I was a founder member of the BRP back in 1997 when it began its first fieldwork season. I have worked in the Castle, Bowl Hole, Barrows, garden test pit project and I am currently the director of the Bradford Kaims Wetland Project as well as a BRP Project Director.

I studied Archaeological Science at the University of Sheffield, and post graduate Law at the University of Northumbria. I have an advanced driving qualification and Bronze medal in swimming and lifesaving.

Outside of the project I divide my archaeological time between experimental work, (smelting, bladesmithing and Medieval jewellery making techniques), writing, and lecturing. I have written for History, Current Archaeology, The Great Outdoors, History of War, Time Out and many other archaeological journals. My most recent book is titled Northumbria: The Lost Kingdom.

I currently lecture on the Bradford Kaims, the wider BRP project, prehistoric technology, metalwork, ancient weapons, and smelting to audiences at a variety of venues, universities, Local Societies and groups.

 

North Site

 

Tom Gardner – Project Officer

Tom G

I’m Tom, the returning Project Officer for the north side of the Kaims in the 2016 season. I am originally from Glasgow (although you will hear Hertfordshire), and now live in Edinburgh where I am working towards a PhD in geoarchaeology. I have been with the BRP for 5 years now as student and then staff, and love the inclusive and engaged atmosphere of the project. Of course the archaeology is exceptional, but what keeps me coming back every year is the people who you meet, and the general feeling of positivity and shared interests.

I am lucky to be at the head of a wonderful and expanded group of staff this year (see below), and can’t wait to see what we will achieve. My primary aims for the season are to get all of our staff trained up and imparting their new knowledge to our students and community volunteers. While doing this we will continue to focus our attention on Trenches 6 and 10, as well as some smaller excavations together with Tom Lally’s team to the south, on some more of our wonderful burnt mounds! Initially we will get going on our Neolithic trough sequence in T6 and get the majority of the burnt mound material trowelled away. Beyond that, we will reopen some of the areas of wooden platform which we investigated last year, and get to grips with the last of the key interfaces on site before we close up at the end of July. Please do come down and join us, or just come see the site! It would be great to share it with you.

 

Sofi Black – Supervisor

Sofi

My name is Sofia Black. I am from Bulgaria and I have just finished my undergraduate BSc in Archaeology in University of Aberdeen. I have been with the Bamburgh Research Project since 2014 and have been a staff member at the Bradford Kaims since 2015.

When I am not at the site, I preoccupy my time with reading, arts and crafts, music, and obsessing over Criminal Minds and Supernatural. Archaeology-wise, I have a keen interest in forensic studies, indigenous/community archaeologies, experimental, and wetland excavations. At the moment I am on the quest to find what is best for me, after I leave the granite wonder that is Aberdeen.

Excited about this new season and looking forward to working with the old and new people.

 

Rachel Brewer – Assistant Supervisor

Rachel B

I’m Rachel and I’m from Illinois, U.S.A. I’m excited to be back with the BRP after participating as a student in 2014. I have a B.A. in History from Southern Illinois University and an M.A. in Archaeology from Cardiff University, Wales.

I’m particularly interested in the Anglo-Saxons and early medieval pottery, but I loved working at the Kaims so much that I decided to go with prehistoric archaeology for the summer! For the last few years I’ve worked as a secondary teacher, but I hope to work in archaeology in the future. I look forward to meeting all of you!

 

Anna Finneran – Assistant Supervisor

Anna

My name is Anna and I’m from Maryland, though currently living in Florida. I first joined the BRP as a student in 2014, while studying as an undergraduate at Durham University. In 2015 I graduated with an MA in archaeology, also from Durham. This season I’ll be an assistant supervisor in Trench 6 at the Kaims.

 

Rachel Moss – Assistant Supervisor

Rachel M

This season, I am an Assistant Supervisor at the Bradford Kaims. I am currently an undergraduate studying History and Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh. For the past two years I have been a student at the Bamburgh Research Project, however, the archaeology of the Bradford Kaims particularly grabbed my attention and I knew that it was the site for me! In my spare time I am an avid supporter of Southampton Football Club, and enjoy music, good food, and wine.

I am incredibly excited to join the team at the Bradford Kaims, and look forward to seeing what will be uncovered this year!

 

South Site

 

Tom Lally – Project Officer

Tom L

G’day guys and girls, my name is Tom Lally and I am a Project Officer at the Bradford Kaims for season 2016. This is my fifth season with the project, after spending two years as a student, and the last three seasons as a staff member out at the Kaims. I will be responsible for several trenches this season, all of which have very exciting features that need to be excavated and understood to tie in with the rest of the site’s incredible archaeology.

I am from Adelaide in South Australia, which is where I undertook all of my university studies specialising in Indigenous Australian archaeology. Since graduating in 2013, I have spent most of my time here in the UK working on the Bamburgh Research Project, and as a commercial archaeologist; working mainly here in the North-east of England. My particular interests here lie in prehistory, but I have also worked on Roman, Medieval, and Industrial sites.

My time at the Bamburgh Research Project has been an incredible experience. I have learnt a wealth of knowledge about British archaeology and archaeological fieldwork in general, while also making lifelong friends. If I had any advice for students this season, I would say don’t be afraid to have a go. We were all fresh, shy students at one point in our lives too.

 

Becky Brummet – Supervisor

Becky

Hey everyone! Becky here and I’ll be one of the Supervisors at the Bradford Kaims for the 2016 field season. I have a Bachelor’s Degree in Anthropology, focus on Archaeology, Minor in Irish Studies and a Certificate in GIS Technology from the University of Montana in the U.S. I currently live in Missoula, Montana with my husband and my cat. My archaeological interests are primarily in Northern European prehistory, which is what drew me to the Bradford Kaims in the first place.

This will be my third season with the Bamburgh Research Project. In 2014, I joined as a student to fulfill my field school requirement at my Uni and it was then that I realized I had truly found my calling (playing in the dirt!). BRP has given me the opportunity to learn, work and dig alongside professional archaeologists as well as introducing me to a variety of wonderful people from around the world. In 2015, I returned to the project as an Assistant Supervisor where I continued learning, though this time from a supervisor’s perspective. The skills I’ve learned from BRP thus far have provided me with confidence and experience to apply for professional archaeology jobs in the US and I’m looking forward to expanding that experience and knowledge even more this season.

I’m anticipating continuing my education by entering a Master’s program in 2017, with a focus on GIS/Remote Sensing and its applications to the field of Archaeology. When I’m not digging in the UK, chances are I’m on a hiking trail or camping with my husband somewhere in the western United States. This season I look forward to seeing old friends, making new friends and learning more from the students and staff alike.

 

Charlie Kerwin – Assistant Supervisor

Charlie

I’m a Londoner currently studying archaeology at the University of Nottingham. I first came to the Bamburgh Research project in 2014 to complete the fieldwork requirements of my degree. I absolutely loved the experience and knew straight away I wanted to come back, returning again as a student in 2015. This season I will be working as an assistant supervisor at the Bradford Kaims. The prehistoric site immediately captured my interest despite my degree focus being the Anglo-Saxon period.

When I’m not at BRP or stressing in the library you will probably find me back in London trying to seem cultured, wandering around an art gallery or at a concert. I’m looking forward to the coming season and being part of such an amazing team.

 

Ian Boyd – Assistant Supervisor

Ian

I’m Ian Boyd and I’m from Portchester, Hampshire via a lot of other places. This is my 2nd year with BRP (Bradford Kaims) and this year I will be assisting Becky Brummet in Trench 11, to continue the excavation from where we left off last year… Rumour has it we will be re-opening Trench 8 (exciting times ahead).

During the ‘Out Of Season’ I spent my time participating on a variety of Experimental Archaeology courses, as well as working as a volunteer for Hampshire Trust (Winchester Museums) where I worked ‘Front of House’.

 

 

 

The Bradford Kaims Wetland Heritage Project report is now available for download

Regular readers of the blog will know we have been undertaking a pilot study at a wetland site at Hoppenwood Bank as part of our study of the Braford Kaims wetland. The work has been generously supported by a grant of more than £35,000 from Your Heritage (a Heritage Lottery Fund scheme) and also by a grant of £13,000 from English Heritage. As this phase of work is coming to an end we have compiled, what we hope is a pretty comprehensive archaeological report. This is now available to download from our website (link to the Bradford Kaims Report).

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Hopefully we will be back to work later this year

Undertaking this work has been a wonderful experience and we have been both delighted and excited by the amazing archaeological discoveries that have emerged. We are hugely grateful to all the volunteers, students and staff members who have participated in the project, donating so much time and effort in the process. We would have achieved very little without you.

We are glad to announce that although the current phase of funding has run out, this is not the end of the Bradford Kaims project. We believe that our pilot study has revealed an archaeological landscape with huge potential and we plan to continue working to investigate it with your help. We intend to be back in June and July this summer and will be looking into new opportunities, in the mean time, to raise funding with which to continue the work.

If you have enjoyed the journey so far then do keep following the blog, because you will be hearing more from the Bradford Kaims, because, as well as raising new supporting grants we will be looking to offer opportunities for volunteers to get back on site this year.

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