Ashington Academy Challenge Week at Bamburgh Castle

Recently Brian Cosgrove and Catrina Clements of Ashington Academy brought three of their pupils, Liam Clark, Ethan Elliot and Ben Hardy up to Bamburgh Castle for Challenge Week. Although we had officially finished the dig the weekend before we were happy to host them and in fact left a little corner of the site open for them to work in.

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Ben Hardy, left and Ethan Elliot, right excvating our troublesome layer

We had a plan to investigate a small block of deposit that might provide clues to help us resolve a problem with Trench 8, our re-evaluation of Brian Hope-Taylor’s Trench 1 from 1960. The deposit was a small triangle of isolated stratigraphy between Trench 8 and Trench 3. it was the continuation into Trench 3 of a confusing layer that we identified when we re-evaluated the Hope-Taylor trench. This layer that produced a limited amount of glazed pottery, now seems to reach down well into the early medieval period (see the section below). It confused us at the time of the re-evaluation in 2006 and now we have excavated much deeper in Trench 3 we have more information and it appears to extend from the 12th to the 9th centuries. As such it spans far too large a period of time for a single phase of activity and must surely represent a series of layers that we are failing to differentiate between. Elswhere in Trench 3 we have clearly different events and structures from this 300 year period. That fact that it is up to 0.4m thick is a further clue that we are missing changes that are simply very hard to see.

Section

The digitised east facing section of Trench 8 as re-recorded in 2006. Layers 806 and 820 are part of a known series of deep midden deposits that date from the 13th centuy to the 15th century. Directly beneath is the probalematic layer, 825, that extends in section all the way to a series of layers and features that we can now date. Thin layers 828 and 863, along with the large post-hole 835 are all provisionally dated to the 9th century. The cobble feature 827 is likely to be even earlier and 8th century.

Excavation within Trench 3 has also revealed that the stratigraphic layers get deeper to the south and west and that near Trench 8 the accumulation of deposits over time was slower and shallower. As we are currently writing up Trench 8 for publication it would be very useful to be able to demonstrate if this deep deposit really did comprise more than one stratigraphic layer. So we decided that we would excavate a sample of the surviving deposit in three successive units, in a verticla sequence, separating the finds and taking a sub-samples for flotation from each. We hoped that we just might be able to see changes in the finds or identify material we could date from each unit, as a test of our idea.

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Liam Clark helping out with recording

Brian and Catrina and their small team helped to excavate the layer in its units, take the samples and for good measure we processed one on site with them as well. As normal we identified and collected the finds as we dug, sieved all the deposit through a 6mm grid and 3D located the one small find, a piece of lead. We were not able to differentiate layers in plan as we dug them any better than we were in the section. Animal bone was common throughout the three units, but the only pottery sherds came from the upper one. Interesting, but far too limited evidence to form any conclusions yet. We will further analyse the finds and samples over the next few weeks, but may need to date each unit through radiocarbon assay to stand a chance of coming up with solid proof.

British Academy/Leverhulme Funding Awarded to the Bradford Kaims

We are very pleased to announce that an application to the British Academy/Leverhulme ‘Small Grants’ fund has been awarded for the Bradford Kaims. A total award of £9,490 has been awarded to Richard Tipping, Tom Gardner, and Paul Gething on behalf of the Bradford Kaims investigations to support a comprehensive sequence of radiocarbon dating for the prehistoric landscape, which has been under investigation since 2010.

This award will allow 26 radiocarbon dates to be sought from a suite of archaeological and natural deposits across the landscape at the Bradford Kaims, focussing upon the large burnt mound in Trench 6, and a sequence of well-preserved peat deposits immediately adjacent to this site. The generous support of this award, in addition to the £756 attained from Heritage at Risk and Northumberland County Council in November 2016, and the £1,500 attained from Northumberland County Council in October 2016 will allow the dating of the site and surrounding landscape to extend to 32 radiocarbon dates in addition to the 5 dates already attained across the site. With this scientific and chronological support, the ongoing interpretation of the archaeology at the Bradford Kaims can make a significant impact upon our understanding of the patterns of prehistoric activity in North Northumberland.

We are very grateful to the British Academy/Leverhulme for their support. If you want to volunteer on our final excavation season at the Bradford Kaims (11th June – 16th July 2017), then please email our team at paulgething@bamburghresearchproject.co.uk to discuss volunteering opportunities, or get on touch at colekelly@bamburghresearchproject.co.uk if you would like to apply for a student position on the excavation.

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Dating Funding Awarded to the Bradford Kaims

We are pleased to announce that the Bradford Kaims site has been awarded two small funding grants to undertake radiocarbon dating of some of our features across Trench 6, and to tie our coring activities in with the rest of the excavations. The funding was sought immediately after the end of the 2016 season to clarify the dates of certain areas of the excavation uncovered this year.

Primarily, we have been awarded £1500 from the Northumberland County Council Community Chest scheme to date a series of preserved hazelnut shells through our large wooden platform feature in Trench 6, following on from the £1,000 grant we received from this fund in 2015 to enable community volunteer involvement. We selected hazelnut shells as the datable component as they are a very short-lived ecofact, only absorbing base carbon from the atmosphere for a short period (<1 year), rather than over longer periods such as other carbon-storing ecofacts can do. Dating oak (Quercus) for example, can provide discrepancies of up to 500 years, as it can be such a long-lived tree. As the first grant from this fund allowed dozens of community volunteers to come on to site and work with us, especially on the platform area, we thought it appropriate to use the second grant awarded from the Community Chest to date that area of the site, to finalise the good work that our volunteers have done. Many thanks to the Community Chest fund and all of our volunteers for their support and help!

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Community volunteers digging the platform

Our second grant is slightly smaller, a total of £756 awarded to us through the Heritage at Risk and Northumberland County Council Conservation Grant for two more radiocarbon dates on our platform area, which will finalise its dating and allow us to tie this feature into our other chronologies across the site. Hopefully these two dating grants can be used as pump-primer funds on dates to help us get further funding from across the site and landscape. Hopefully we will have more good news for you all soon!

Tom Gardner