Festival of Archaeology Update/Youth Takeover III

Our second day of environmental archaeology tutorials as part of the Festival of Archaeology went well, without the intermittent monsoons of yesterday! We will have a step-by-step guide to environmental processing later in the week to explain just what we were doing.

Tomorrow (22 July) is both the Youth Takeover celebration as well as A Day in Archaeology. Click here to read about a day in the life of people in various archaeological roles as well as some behind the scenes info about how digs work!


Below is another Youth Takeover post, where Nathalie (21, left) talks about making archaeology more accessible.

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Accessing Archaeology

As a student in ancient history and history, I had only come across archaeology in lectures and readings, but have had little opportunity to actually study it apart from the most introductory modules. Archaeology provides so much evidence that is vital to our understanding of the past, but can be overlooked when just looking at documentary evidence. I think that it is extremely important to include archaeological study in any study of the past, particularly as it provides a much needed different perspective, often a multidisciplinary view.

I have always been interested in archaeology, visiting sites throughout my childhood, in particular spending hours wandering around the British Museum. Even now I still drag my parents and reluctant sister to numerous obscure sites (some turning out to be rather big adventures) wherever we go. More and more through my degree, I have come to realise that it was archaeology that truly moved me. I have been taking any module I could that was related, which was surprisingly difficult as my university still doesn’t actually have a proper archaeology department. Through the opportunities that field schools have provided, I am starting to build up some experience in the field that I was missing in the classroom. However it worries me that this is something that is not always possible for many financially.

Field schools can sometimes be prohibitively expensive, especially as a student. This could prevent many people of every demographic getting vital experience due to socioeconomic circumstance rather than their ability. This is compounded by the fact that many archaeology jobs are not well paid, making it difficult to even support yourself, let alone pay back the multitude of loans needed to get the degrees in the subject you love so dearly. I myself plan to pursue a masters in archaeology, but I feel so absolutely lucky that I am able to do this, as many don’t have these opportunities.

Archaeology in the future needs to become more open to people from all backgrounds, but we as a field especially need to address socioeconomic diversity. We must do all we can to promote low-cost or free field schools and scholarships (which is difficult to provide because of competition and lack of funding, I know, I know), or even push for restructuring of the wage system both to allow professional archaeologists to pay back loans and also make it a more viable long-term career prospect. If we don’t make this change now for the future of archaeology, it will continue to be a field closed off to many.

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