New article from the Bradford Kaims published in the Archaeological Journal

At the start of this year we were happy to see the publication of the first of a raft of new articles based on the Bradford Kaims site, which the BRP have been excavating since 2010. This article, Assessing the contribution of integrated geoarchaeological approaches to understand the formation and function of burnt mounds: the example of Hoppenwood Bank, North Northumberland, focusses on how we used environmental science to unravel how Mound 1 at the Bradford Kaims was formed. The article includes some methodological consideration on the use of phytoliths for understanding fuel use (spoiler, it didn’t work) but largely deals with the micromorphological record, which was far more useful. As this research came off the back of Tom Gardner’s MSc results and includes some of his PhD results, we must thank generous funding from the Carnegie Trust and the Moray Endowment Fund which supported Tom’s work, as well as the funders of the Bradford Kaims; the British Academy, the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Royal Archaeological Institute, and the Duke of Northumberland.

You can read the article for more details here, and if you can’t access it, then email us or comment on our Facebook page with a request, and Tom can send along the PDF.

Gardner, T.H., 2019, Assessing the contribution of integrated geoarchaeological approaches to understand the formation and function of burnt mounds: the example of Hoppenwood Bank, North Northumberland, Archaeological Journal, 176, pp. 51-83.

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